Hugh Falkus: A Life on the Edge by Chris Newton

March 10, 2009 at 11:23 am | Posted in Books, Mosgiel, Non-Fiction, Reviews | 4 Comments

The author has done a remarkably good job of portraying Falkus.

This will almost certainly remain the definitive biography of Hugh Falkus –  an often arrogant and difficult man who will remain one of the greats among angling personalities, writers and film makers.

His specialty was the sea trout while his achievements in writing and film- making were impressive.

Falkus was a colourful person there can’t be any doubt about that.

Shot down in his spitfire, prisoner of war, actor, film-maker, author, four times married outdoorsy type,fly fisherman,wildfowler… Faulkus, surprisingly, did end up a comparatively happy man living a simple and wholesome life.

It seems rather a pity that he didn’t live here in New Zealand, his life would almost certainly have been less complicated.

There would have been far less stress and strain on him and a great deal more natural beauty, and perhaps most important, far better fishing and shooting.

He had a circle of good friends: Arthur Oglesby, Fred Buller, Bill Arnold – many of the top names in the field.

But perhaps best of all, a woman who truly loved him. The simple and beautiful country girl Kathleen Armstrong, who stood by him through all his hell-raising and nonsense. Chris Newton’s book is a remarkably interesting portrait and a fine read.

Reviewed by Garrett

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4 Comments »

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  1. Hello!
    Very Interesting post! Thank you for such interesting resource!
    PS: Sorry for my bad english, I’v just started to learn this language 😉
    See you!
    Your, Raiul Baztepo

    • You are most welcome.

  2. Hi !!! 😉
    My name is Piter Kokoniz. Just want to tell, that your posts are really interesting
    And want to ask you: what was the reasson for you to start this blog?
    Sorry for my bad english:)
    Thank you:)
    Your Piter

    • Hi Piter,

      We wanted to use the blog as another way to communicate with our library members and others interested in what we do.

      Regards.


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